I Just Called to Say I Love You (2013)

 

During a trip to Salzburg, Austria, I was wandering through a used book shop when I came across a group of old postcards written to Anna Hermandinger. Since I don't read German, I relied on the imagery to piece together details of who Anna might have been. Other, blank postcards in the pile suggested possibilities.

To rely on these objects for communication seemed archaic and slow, yet I struggled to get my smartphone to do any better -- out-of-network and overseas. Anna's struggle seemed no different than mine. So I combined her postcards with my own efforts to communicate to loved ones during my trip.

As our emails pile up in anonymous databases and our online profile is forever cemented into a Google search, the physicality of these postcards seemed precious, fleeting, and human -- hand-crafted and cast into the mail system with faith like a message in a bottle. What thoughts of mine would survive the voyage of distance and time?

Joe Reynolds Photographs

I Just Called To Say I Love You, no.1

Salzburg Phone Book, 2001
Inkjet Prints
Postcard to Anna, ca. 1930 (front)
Silver Gelatin Print
Postcard to Anna, ca. 1930 (back)
Inkjet Print, 2013 (scanned; emailed to myself; downloaded; printed)

Joe Reynolds Photographs

I Just Called To Say I Love You, no.1

detail

Joe Reynolds Photographs

I Just Called To Say I Love You, no.2

Salzburg Phone Book, 2001
Inkjet Prints
Postcard to Anna, ca. 1930 (front)
Silver Gelatin Print
Postcard to Anna, ca. 1930 (back)
Inkjet Print, 2013 (scanned; emailed to myself; downloaded; printed)